Primary 3 to 6 Science Syllabus (MOE)

 Topic: Diversity:

Students should appreciate that there is a great variety of living and non-living things in Diversity include:the world. The study of the diversity in the world will also allow students to appreciatethe importance and necessity of maintaining it.
 
Man seeks to organise this great variety of living things to better understand the world in which he lives. There are common threads that connect all living things and unifying factors in the diversity of non-living things that help him to classify them.
 
In this theme, we study the diversity of living and non-living things as well as materials. 
 
 

Suggested Key Inquiry Questions in Diversity includes:

  1. What is our environment made up of? 
  2. Why is it important to maintain diversity? 
  3. How do we go about understanding the diverse range of living and non-living  things? 

Learning Outcomes

Knowledge, Understanding and Application 

Skills and Processes 

Ethics and Attitudes 

 Diversity of Living and Non-Living Things 

*Describe the characteristics of living things. 

- need water, food and air to survive 

- grow, respond and reproduce 

 

*Recognise some broad groups of living  things 

- plants (e.g. flowering, non-flowering) 

- animals (e.g. birds, fish, insects, mammals) 

- fungi (e.g. mushroom, yeast) 

- bacteria 

 

*List the various types of materials and relate 

their properties to their uses. e.g. plastics, 

wood, rubber, metals 

*Observe a variety of living and non-living things and infer differences between them. 

 

*Classify living things into broad groups (plants and animals) based on similarities and differences of common observable characteristics 

 

*Compare materials based on their physical  properties. 

- hardness 

- strength 

- flexibility 

- ability to float/sink in water 

*Show curiosity in exploring the surrounding living and non-living things. 

 

*Value individual effort and team work. 

 

*Show objectivity by using data and information to validate observations and  explanations about the properties and uses of  materials

 

Topic: Cycles:

There are repeated patterns of change in nature. Examples of these cycles are the life Cycles include:cycles of living things and the water cycle. Understanding these cycles helps Man to predict events and processes and to appreciate the Earth as a self-sustaining system. 

 

In this theme, we learn about the Cycles in plants and animals as well as matter and water.

 

Suggested Key Inquiry Questions in Cycle includes:

  1. What are the cycles in our everyday life? 
  2. How are cycles important to life?

Learning Outcomes 

Knowledge, Understanding and Application 

Skills and Processes 

Ethics and Attitudes 

Cycles in Plants and Animals 

*Show an understanding that different  organisms  have different life cycles. 

- Plants 

- Animals 

 

**Show an understanding that living things  reproduce to ensure continuity of their kind 

and that many characteristics of an  organism are passed on from parents to  offspring 

 

**Recognise the processes in the sexual  reproduction of flowering plants. 

- pollination 

- fertilisation (seed production) 

- seed dispersal 

- germination 

 

**Recognise the process of fertilisation in  the sexual reproduction of humans. 

 

**Recognise the similarity in terms of  fertilisation in the sexual reproduction of 

flowering plants and humans. 

*  Observe  and compare the life cycles of  plants grown from seeds over a period of  time 

 

*Observe and compare the life cycles of  animals  over a period of time. e.g. butterfly,  mealworm, grasshopper, cockroach,  chicken, frog.

 

**Investigate the various ways in which  plants reproduce and communicate findings 

- spores 

 - seeds 

*Show curiosity in exploring the surrounding  plants and animals and question what they  find 

 

*Show concern by being responsible  towards plants and animals such as their  own  pets. 

 

*  Value  individual effort and team work. 

 

**Show curiosity in exploring the  surrounding plants and animals and  question  what they find. 

 

**Show concern by being responsible  towards plants and animals such as their  own pets. 

 

**Value individual effort and team work. 

 

 

Topic: Systems:

A system is a whole consisting of parts that work together to perform a function. System include:There are systems in nature as well as man-made systems. Examples of systems

in nature are the digestive and respiratory systems. Examples of man-madesystems are electrical systems.

Understanding these systems allows Man to understand how they operate and how parts influence and interact with one another to perform a function. In this theme, we learn about the plant, human, cell and electrical systems.

Suggested Key Inquiry Questions in includes:

  1. What are the different parts of a system? 
  2. How do parts of a system or different  systems interact together to perform a  function?

 

Learning Outcomes

Knowledge,Understanding and  Application 

Skills and Processes 

Ethics and Attitudes 

Plant System 

*Identify the different parts of plants and  state  their functions. 

- leaf 

- stem 

- root 

 

**Identify the parts of the plant transport  system  and describe their functions. 

*Observe plant parts. 

 

 

 

 

 

**Investigate the functions of plant parts  and communicate  findings. 

- leaf 

- stem 

- root 

*Show curiosity in exploring the  surrounding plants and question what they  find 

 

*Show concern by being responsible  towards  plants. 

 

**Show objectivity by seeking data and  information to validate observations and 

explanations  about plant parts and functions. 

 

Learning Outcomes 

Knowledge,Understanding and  Application 

Skills and Processes 

Ethics and Attitudes 

Human System 

*Identify the organ systems in human  (digestive, respiratory, circulatory, skeletal  and muscular). 

 

*Identify the organs in the human digestive  system and describe their functions. 

 

**Recognise that air is a mixture of gases  such as nitrogen, carbon dioxide, oxygen  and water vapour. 

 

**Identify the organs of the human  respiratory and circulatory systems and  describe their functions. 

 

**Recognise the integration of the different  systems(digestive, respiratory and  circulatory) in carrying out life processes. 

 

 

**Compare how plants, fish and mammals  take in oxygen and give out carbon  dioxide.

 

**Compare the ways in which nutrients,  water and oxygen are transported within  plants and humans. 

- plants: tubes that transport food and  water 

- humans: blood vessels that transport 

digested food and other substances 

*Show curiosity in exploring their own body  and questioning about the structures or  functions of the body. 

 

 

 

 

**Show objectivity by seeking data and 

information to validate observations and 

explanations about their body. 

 
 

Learning Outcomes 

Knowledge,Understanding and   Application 

Skills and Processes 

Ethics and Attitudes 

Cell System 

**Show an understanding that a cell is a   basic  unit of life. 

 

**Identify the different parts of a typical   plant cell and animal cell and relate the   parts  to the functions. 

 

- parts of plant cell: cell wall, cell 

membrane, cytoplasm, nucleus and   chloroplasts 

 

- parts of animal cell: cell membrane,   cytoplasm, nucleus 

**Compare a typical plant and animal cell. 

**Show curiosity in exploring the  microscopic world and questioning what   they  find. 

 

**Value individual effort and team work. 

 

Learning Outcomes

Knowledge,Understanding and  Application

Skills and Processes

Ethics and Attitudes

Electrical System

** Recognise that an electric circuit  consisting of an energy source (battery)  and other circuit components (wire, bulb,

switch  ) forms an electrical system.

 

**Show an understanding that a current  can  only flow through a closed circuit.

 

**Identify electrical conductors and  insulators  .

 

** Recognise that good conductors of  electricity are generally good conductors of heat  .

**Construct simple circuits from circuit diagrams  .

 

**Investigate the effect of some variables  on the current in a circuit and communicate  findings.

- number of batteries (arranged in series)

- number of bulbs (arranged in series and parallel)

**Show concern for the need to conserve and to have proper use and handling of

electricity  .

 

**Value individual effort and team work.

 

 

Topic:   Interactions:

Understanding the interactions between and within systems helps Man to better  understand the environment and his role in it. Interactions occur within an organism,  between organisms as well as between organisms and the environment. There are  also interactions between forces and objects.

The interaction of Man with his  environment drives the development of Science and Technology. At the same time,  Science and Technology influences the way Man interacts with his environment. By  understanding the interactions between Man and his environment, students can better  appreciate the consequences of their actions and be responsible for their actions.

In  this theme, we learn about the interaction of forces and interactions in the environment.

 

Suggested Key Inquiry Questions in  Interactions include:

  1. How does Man interact with his  surroundings? 
  2. What are the consequences of Man’s  interactions with his surroundings? 

 

Learning Outcomes

Knowledge,Understanding and Application

Skills and Processes

Ethics and Attitudes

Interactions of Forces

*Recognise that a magnet can exert a push  or a pull.

 

*Identify the characteristics of magnets.

 

- magnets can be made of iron or steel

 

- magnets have two poles. A freely  suspended bar magnet comes to rest  pointing in a N-S direction.

 

- unlike poles attract and like poles repel

 

- magnets attract magnetic materials

 

*List some uses of magnets in everyday  objects.

 

**Identify a force as a push or a pull.

 

**Show an understanding of the effects of a  force.

- A force can move a stationary object

- A force can speed up, slow down or  change the direction of motion

- A force can stop a moving object

- A force may change the shape of an object

 

**Recognise and give examples of the different types of forces.

- magnetic force

- gravitational force

- elastic spring force

- frictional force

 

**Recognise that objects have weight  because of the gravitational force between

them and the Earth.

*Compare magnets and non-magnets.

 

*Make a magnet by the ’Stroke’ method and

the electrical method.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

**Investigate the effect of friction on the motion of objects and communicate findings.

 

**Investigate the effects of forces on springs  and communicate findings.

*Show curiosity in exploring magnets and questio n what they find.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

**Show objectivity by using data and information to validate observations and

explanations about forces.

 

**Value individual effort and team work.


 

Learning Outcomes

Knowledge,Understanding and  Application

Skills and Processes

Ethics and Attitudes

Interactions within the Environment

**Describe the characteristics of a local  environment. e.g. temperature, amount  of light.

 

**Identify the factors that affect the  survival of an organism.

- physical characteristics of

the environment.

 

- availability of food

- types of other organisms

present.

 

**Discuss the effect on organisms when  the environment becomes unfavourable.

e.g. organisms adapt and survive; move  to other places or die.

 

**Trace the energy pathway from the  Sun through living things and identify the  roles of various organisms (producers,

consumers, decomposers; predators,  preys) in a food chain and a food web.

 

**Differentiate among the terms

organism, population and community.

- An organism is a living thing.

- A population is defined as a group of  plants and animals of the same kind,  living and reproducing at a given place  and time.

 

- A community consists of many

populations living together in a

particular place.

 

**Show an understanding that different  habitats support different communities.

e.g. garden, field, pond, seashore, tree

 

**Recognise that adaptations serve to  enhance survival and can be structural  or behavioural.

- cope with physical factors

- obtain food

- escape predators

- reproduce by finding and attracting  mates or dispersing seeds

 

**Give examples of man’s impact (both  positive and negative) on the  environment. e.g. deforestation, global

warming, pollution

**Observe, collect and record

information regarding the interacting factors within an environment.

**Show concern by being respectful and responsible towards the environment and the organisms living in it.

 

**Show concern for Man’s impact on the environment.

 

**Value individual effort and team work.

 

   Topic:  Energy:

Students should appreciate that energy affects both living and non-living things. It Energy include:  makes changes and movement possible in everyday life. There are many forms of  energy and one form can be converted to another.

Man uses energy in many  ways, for many different purposes. Man is not the only animal that uses energy;  all living things obtain energy and use it to carry out life processes. Understanding  this theme will allow students to appreciate the importance and uses of energy  and the need to conserve it. In this theme, we learn about various energy forms,  uses and conversions.

Suggested Key Inquiry Questions in Energy includes:

  1. How does Energy affect Man and his  surroundings? 
  2. Why is it important to conserve  energy? 

 

Learning Outcomes

Knowledge,Understanding and  Application

Skills and Processes

Ethics and Attitudes

Energy Forms and Uses

*Recognise that an object can be seen  when it reflects light or when it is a source  of light.

 

*Recognise that a shadow is formed when  light is completely or partially blocked by  an object.

 

*List some common sources of heat.

 

*State that the temperature of an object is  a measurement of its degree of hotness.

 

*Differentiate between heat and

temperature.

- heat is a form of energy

- temperature is a measurement of the  degree of hotness of an object.

 

*Show an understanding that heat flows  from a hotter to a colder object until both reach the same temperature.

 

*Relate the change in temperature of an  object to the gain or loss of heat by the object.

 

*List some effects of heat gain/loss in our  everyday life.

- contraction / expansion of

objects.

- change in state of matter

 

*Identify good and bad conductors of heat.

- good conductors: metals

- bad conductors: wood,

plastic, air.

 

**Recognise that energy is required to make things work or move.

 

**State that living things need energy to carry out life processes.

**Recognise that the Sun is our primary source of light and heat energy.

 

**Show an understanding that food produced by plants becomes the source of energy for animals.

 

**Differentiate the ways in which plants  and animals obtain their food.

*Investigate the transparency of materials  to light and communicate findings. e.g.

using datalogger

 

*Measure temperature using a thermometer or a datalogger

 

**Investigate the requirements (water, 

light energy and carbon dioxide) for  photosynthesis (production of sugar and   oxygen) and communicate findings. 

*Show concern for the need to conserve energy.

 

*Show objectivity by seeking data and information to validate observations and

explanations about heat.

 

**Show objectivity by using data and  information to validate observations and 

explanations about photosynthesis. 

 

Learning Outcomes 

Knowledge,Understanding and   Application 

Skills and Processes 

Ethics and Attitudes 

Energy Conversion 

**Recognise that energy from most of our   energy resources is derived in some ways   from the Sun. 

 

**Recognise and give examples of the   various forms of energy. 

- kinetic energy 

- potential energy 

- light energy 

- electrical energy 

- sound energy 

- heat energy 

**Investigate energy conversion from one  form to another and communicate findings. 

**Show concern for the need to conserve  energy usage in our everyday life. 



Primary 3 to 6 Science Syllabus  (   Foundation Science)

Topic: Cycles:

There are repeated patterns of change in nature. Examples of these cycles are the life Cycles include:  cycles of living things and the water cycle.

Understanding these cycles helps Man to  predict events and processes and to appreciate the Earth as a self-sustaining system.  In this theme, we learn about the Cycles in plants and animals as well as matter and  water. 

 

Suggested Key Inquiry Questions in Cycles includes:

  1. What are the cycles in our everyday life?  
  2. How are cycles important to life? 

 

 

Learning Outcomes 

Knowledge,Understanding and Application 

Skills and Processes 

Ethics and Attitudes 

Cycles in Plants and Animals 

**State the processes in the sexual   reproduction of flowering plants. 

 

- pollination 

 

- fertilisation (seed production) 

 

- seed dispersal 

- germination 

 

**State the process of fertilisation in the  sexual reproduction of humans. 

**Observe and compare the various ways   in which plants reproduce and  communicate  findings. 

 

- spores 

 

- seeds 

**Show curiosity in exploring the  surrounding plants and animals and   question what they find. 

 

**Show concern by being responsible  towards plants and animals such as their 

own pets. 

 

**Value individual effort and team work. 



 

Learning Outcomes 

Knowledge,Understanding and   Application 

Skills and Processes 

Ethics and Attitudes 

Cycles in Matter and Water 

**Recognise that water can exist in three   interchangeable states of matter. 

 

**State how water changes from one state   to another. 

 

- Melting (solid to liquid) 

- Evaporation / Boiling

(liquid to gas) 

 

- Condensation (gas to liquid) 

 

- Freezing (liquid to solid) 

 

**State the melting point of ice (or freezing   point of water) and boiling point of water. 

 

**Recognise the changes in states of  water in the water cycle. 

 

**Recognise the importance of the water  cycle. 

**Compare water in 3 states. 

**Show concern for water as a limited  natural resource and the need for water 

conservation. 



 

Topic: Systems:


A system is a whole consisting of parts that work together to perform a function. System include:  There are systems in nature as well as man-made systems. Examples of systems

in nature are the digestive and respiratory systems. Examples of man-made  systems are electrical systems.

Understanding these systems allows Man to  understand how they operate and how parts influence and interact with one  another to perform a function. In this theme, we learn about the plant, human, cell  and electrical systems.

Suggested Key Inquiry Questions in Systems includes:

  1. What are the different parts of a system?  
  2. How do parts of a system or different   systems interact together to perform a  function? 

Learning Outcomes

Knowledge,Understanding and   Application 

Skills and Processes 

Ethics and Attitudes 

Plant System 

** Recognise how water is transported from   the roots to other parts of the plants and  how food is transported from the leaves to   the  other parts of the plants. 

** Observe and recognise the functions of   plant  parts and communicate findings. 

 

- leaf 

- stem 

- root 

**Show objectivity by seeking data and 

information to validate observationsand   explanations about plant parts and 

functions 

 

Learning Outcomes 

Knowledge,Understanding and   Application 

Skills and Processes 

Ethics and Attitudes 

Human System 

**Recognise that air is a mixture of gases   such as nitrogen, carbon dioxide, oxygen  and water vapour. 

 

**Identify the organs of the human   respiratory and circulatory systems and  state their functions. 

**Compare how plants and mammals take  in oxygen and give out carbon dioxide. 

**Show objectivity by seeking data and 

information to validate observations and 

explanations about their body. 



Learning Outcomes 

Knowledge,Understanding and Application 

Skills and Processes 

Ethics and Attitudes 

Interaction of Forces 

.  **Identify a force as a push or a pull. 

 

**State the effects of a force. 

 

- A force can move a stationary object 

 

- A force can speed up, slow down or   change the direction of motion 

 

- A force can stop a moving object 

 

- A force may change the shape of an object 

 

**Recognise and give examples of the   different types of forces. 

 

- magnetic force 

 

- gravitational force 

 

- frictional force

 

**Recognise that objects have weight   because of the gravitational force between 

them and the Earth

**Investigate the effect of friction on the   motion of objects and communicate findings. 

**Show objectivity by using data and  information to validate observations and 

explanations about forces. 

 

**Value individual effort and team work. 


Learning Outcomes 

Knowledge,Understanding and Application 

Skills and Processes 

Ethics and Attitudes 

Interactions within the Environment 

**Identify the following factors that affect the  survival of an organism. 

- temperature and light 

- availability of food 

- types of other organisms  present 

**Trace the energy pathway from the Sun through  living things and identify the roles of various  organisms (producers, predators, preys) in a food  chain. 

**Recognise that different habitats support  different organisms.

e.g. garden, field, pond,  seashore, tree 

**Recognise that adaptations serve to enhance  survival and can be structural or behavioural. 

- cope with physical factors 

- obtain food 

- escape predators 

- reproduce by finding and attracting mates or  dispersing seeds 

**Give examples of man’s impact (both positive  and negative) on the environment. e.g.  deforestation, global warming, pollution 

**Observe, collect and record information regarding the interacting  factors within an environment. 

**Show concern by being respectful and  responsible towards the environment and 

the organisms living in it. 

**Show concern for Man’s impact on the  environment. 

**Value individual effort and team work. 


Topic: Energy:

Students should appreciate that energy affects both living and non-living things. It makes Questions in Energy include:  changes and movement possible in everyday life. There are many forms of energy and one  form can be converted to another.

Man uses energy in many ways, for many different  purposes. Man is not the only animal that uses energy; all living things obtain energy and  use it to carry out life processes. Understanding this theme will allow students to appreciate  the importance and uses of energy and the need to conserve it. In this theme, we learn  about various energy forms and uses.

Suggested Key Inquiry questions includes:

  1. How does Energy affect Man  and his surroundings?  
  2. Why is it important to conserve  energy? 

Learning Outcomes 

Knowledge,Understanding and   Application 

Skills and Processes 

Ethics and Attitudes 

Energy Forms and Uses 

** Recognise that energy is required to   make  things work or move. 

 

** Recognise that the Sun is our primary   source  of light and heat energy. 

 

** Recognise that food produced by plants   becomes the source of energy for 

animals 

**Investigate the requirements (water, 

light energy and carbon dioxide) for  photosynthesis (production of sugar and   oxygen  ) and communicate findings. 

**Show objectivity by using data and  information to validate observations and 

explanations  about photosynthesis. 

 

**Show concern for the need to conserve  energy  usage in our everyday life. 

 

   You can also get the  full  Primary 3 to 6 Science Syllabus  (MOE) from the below link: http://www.moe.gov.sg/education/syllabuses/sciences/